Viva La Vida

The Heavens declare the Glory of God and the firmament sheweth his handiwork.

wellthatsadorable:

If you’re like me and it doesn’t feel like a really successful Sunday unless tears of joy burst out of your body, consider this Sunday a SUCCESS!

Awwwhhhhh <3 

(Source: sizvideos)

wellthatsadorable:

larhunter:

biomorphosis:

This is not a tasty gummy sweet but a Jewel Caterpillar found in Amazon Rainforest. They are covered with sticky goo-like, gellatinous tubercles that provides protection from its predator like ants until they metamorphosise into winged moths.

Be honest, this is a pokemon.

YO, POKEMON FOUND IN THE AMAZON, SIGNAL BOOST

This is mesmerizing!

wordsnquotes:

BOOK OF THE DAY:
The Giver by Lois Lowry
Lois Lowry’s The Giver is the perfect dystopian novel, with one atypical feature, its characters live in a world of peace and control. Pain, war, fear and prejudice have been eliminated in this futuristic society. Each person has an assigned role in the Community; there are no difficult or easy choices to make in life. Everybody looks and behaves the same. 
At the age of 12, Jonas is chosen to receive special training from The Giver. The Giver is the sole person in the Community who holds memories of the authentic pleasures and suffering of life. 
As a successor of the truth, Jonas is left without a choice and a heavy burden. Once given the memories of life, Jonas discovers a horrible reality: the society he lives in is a prison covered by a veil of placidity.
In comparison to other utopian novels, like The Hunger Games, The Giver is quieter. It takes a more philosophical approach than an action-pact journey. It is clear from the beginning that Jonas is far too young to be given such a heavy responsibility. 
It is easy to lose oneself in Jonas’ character. His newfound wisdom makes him extremely sensitive to beauty, pain and pleasure. He becomes passionate and loving to those closest to him. 
The most symbolic and beautiful feature of Lowry’s novel is the power of memory. Inspired by her aging father who had lost his long-term memory, Lowry’s instant classic reveals the vulnerability of life. Although each person lives in a superbly controlled environment, the contrast between dullness and passion gives the book superiority in the genre of young adult utopian fiction. 
Read excerpts from the novel here. Get the book here!
Facebook  | Instagram |  Twitter |  Pinterest  |  Society6
[img src]

Must read some time!

wordsnquotes:

BOOK OF THE DAY:

The Giver by Lois Lowry

Lois Lowry’s The Giver is the perfect dystopian novel, with one atypical feature, its characters live in a world of peace and control. Pain, war, fear and prejudice have been eliminated in this futuristic society. Each person has an assigned role in the Community; there are no difficult or easy choices to make in life. Everybody looks and behaves the same. 

At the age of 12, Jonas is chosen to receive special training from The Giver. The Giver is the sole person in the Community who holds memories of the authentic pleasures and suffering of life. 

As a successor of the truth, Jonas is left without a choice and a heavy burden. Once given the memories of life, Jonas discovers a horrible reality: the society he lives in is a prison covered by a veil of placidity.

In comparison to other utopian novels, like The Hunger Games, The Giver is quieter. It takes a more philosophical approach than an action-pact journey. It is clear from the beginning that Jonas is far too young to be given such a heavy responsibility. 

It is easy to lose oneself in Jonas’ character. His newfound wisdom makes him extremely sensitive to beauty, pain and pleasure. He becomes passionate and loving to those closest to him. 

The most symbolic and beautiful feature of Lowry’s novel is the power of memory. Inspired by her aging father who had lost his long-term memory, Lowry’s instant classic reveals the vulnerability of life. Although each person lives in a superbly controlled environment, the contrast between dullness and passion gives the book superiority in the genre of young adult utopian fiction. 

Read excerpts from the novel here. Get the book here!

Facebook  | Instagram |  Twitter |  Pinterest  |  Society6

[img src]

Must read some time!

Your first family is your blood family and you always be true to that. That means something. But there’s another family and that’s the kind you go out and find. Maybe even by accident sometimes. And they’re as much blood as your first family. Maybe more so, because they don’t have to look out for you and they don’t have to love you. They choose to.

Dennis Lehane, The Given Day (via wordsnquotes)

This touched me a certain kind of way.

(via wordsnquotes)

Here&#8217;s my Jensen. :)

Here’s my Jensen. :)